Skip to main content

Raspberry Power

After sitting on the sidelines of the Raspberry Pi revolution for a few months, I recently picked up a model B from Newark. (There were a 100 units in stock a few days ago but as of this time, they are showing 0 in stock.) I wanted to complete the accessory setup with minimal wires and maximum portability. Newark offers a host of suggestions for each accessory but I decided to get parts separately.

Here's the setup I chose:

  1. SD Card: An old Patriot 4GB SDHC card but Fry's has a Samsung 8GB micro SDHC card (with the SD adapter) for $4.99.
  2. OS: Raspbian “wheezy” available from the Raspberry Pi downloads page.
  3. Keyboard/Mouse: The cheapest wireless keyboard/mouse combination at Fry's which happened to be an iConcepts 2.4GHz Wireless Keyboard and Optical Mouse for $14.99. The dongle that connects to USB is tiny!
  4. Wi-Fi: I decided to skip the wired interface and instead got the Patriot Mini Wireless-N USB Wi-Fi adapter for $14.99 at Fry's. The adapter is quite small (see picture of the full setup below).
  5. HDMI cable: Again, the cheapest at Fry's - a 6ft HDMI cable for $6.99.
  6. Power supply: This is one place where I didn't want anything that had to be connected to the mains. I want to use the Pi eventually for portable applications and the best alternative seemed to be the portable chargers for mobile phones. After some hunting, I settled on the Concept Green CG2000-B portable charger. This one came with the micro USB connector (in addition to mini USB and iPod/iPhone) making it ideal for the Pi. The CG2000 charges via USB (mini USB to USB port on a computer) and discharges via USB to micro USB. This one was $19.99 at Fry's but is also available online for a little cheaper.

All-in-all, that added $62 to the base $35 price of the Pi. Here's the end result:

I'm quite happy with the setup and now it's time to build something fun with it :-)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Migrating from Palm Calendar to Google Calendar and iPhone

Here are the free steps to migrate from Palm's date book (or Pimlico's DateBk6 ) calendar to Google calendar for full iPhone sync. First, sync Palm with Palm Desktop . Next, open Palm Desktop, select the Calendar view, navigate to File | Export, select Export Type as Date Book Archive, Range as All and provide a file name. This will export the calendar data as Date Book Archive (.dba). There's a paid tool called DBA2CSV that converts .dba files to .csv files. However this can be done for free using Yahoo Calendar. Login into Yahoo Calendar and via Settings/Import, import the .dba file. It helps to have an empty Yahoo Calendar. Via Settings/Export, export the calendar as .csv file. Login to Google Calendar (also works with Google Apps For Your Domain GAFYD Calendar) and import the .csv file into any of the calendars. It is a good idea to create a test calendar and test the import before importing into your real calendar. That way if anything goes wrong, you can delet

Lead Tide SIM Reader

I recently came across a cheap little device for reading SIM cards . It was available from Meritline for less than USD 5 with free shipping. Curious to see what it was like, I ordered one. The device came in a small package along with a mini CD containing drivers. The packaging advertised the device as the LEAD TIDE Sim reader . Like most things these days, it's made in China. The device has a USB 1.1 interface. There was no product code or number anywhere on the packaging. Installing the drivers for the device turned out to be harder than I expected. The mini CD's autorun installed some stuff but Microsoft Windows XP couldn't install any suitable driver for the device. The mini-CD had several top level directories with what appeared to be product codes but I couldn't match any to the device itself since it had no product code. Google searches revealed that I wasn't alone in my endeavors to get the device working . Further digging revealed pointers to some thir

Syntax-highlighting code in blog posts

SyntaxHighlighter is an easy to use syntax highlighter for posting code snippets in blogs. Here are the steps to incorporate SyntaxHighlighter into Blogger : Go to the blog dashboard and select Layout for your blog. Choose Edit HTML. In the <head> section, paste in these two lines: <link href='http://syntaxhighlighter.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/Styles/SyntaxHighlighter.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'/> <script language='javascript' src='http://syntaxhighlighter.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/Scripts/shCore.js'/> In addition, for each language that you intend to highlight, add lines to import the relevant JavaScript libraries. The full list of supported languages is here . Here's the example for XML: <script language='javascript' src='http://syntaxhighlighter.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/Scripts/shBrushXml.js'/> Finally, right at the bottom before the </body> tag, add: <script